All posts tagged: History

Walls

Lest we forget that walls, by their very definition, divide, separate, form barriers — should we have to reexamine what these truly mean, not in the surface, we might very well find that it’s not what we want for humanity. In the words of Winston Churchill, “those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” Pictured: a section of the Berlin Wall in Newseum, Washington DC.  Unlike most museums I’ve visited, Newseum made me an emotional mess. The Pulitzer section was a reminder that every generation had their share of disasters and moments that define them, whether it be times of unimaginable sorrow or unmatched glee — the human condition showcased in a timeline of unforgettable images. Times that are forever etched in history, and our collective hearts and psyche, vividly displayed in headlines, pictures and made even more real by interviews of those who lived them. The 9/11 wing must have been the hardest to peruse, with a piece of the building at the center of the space, a very real …

World Heritage Site Tuesday: Ephesus

I am learning as I see more of the world how much I don’t know. I have never heard of Ephesus before the second quarter of last year. Ancient Rome, yes. Athens, yes. Ephesus was an alien concept, and it blew my boyfriend and I away as our tour guide started walking us through the ancient ruins, and telling us the story of the site that doesn’t get as much credit as the Acropolis or Rome. Which also proved how much we know about history and the ancient wonders of the world, since we learned that one of them, the Temple of Artemis, is in Ephesus. As we started the tour, what was most interesting is that the excavation isn’t done yet. Only about 15% is done, which means there is so much we have yet to learn about our history. Pottery, Lunch and Rugs. After the tour, our guide asked us if we would like to pass by a place where they make pottery. We had time, so we said yes, and it turned …

The Weekend That Was: Steamtown

It’s interesting to think that there was a time when airplanes, which are a big part of not only travel, but industry and economy, were not around years ago. This weekend, my boyfriend and I had the chance to visit Steamtown National Historic Park in Scranton, PA, a few hours drive from NYC. It was a great way to learn about the history of the railroad, steam engines and how steam trains contributed to American economy in the 19th century, prior to the advent of the diesel engine — transporting people, food and everything you could think of, across the country — until the automobile industry took over. The museums were very educational and informative regarding the history of the locomotive, and you could take a 45 minute ride on a steam or diesel train. We did all these, but enjoyed the museums much more than the ride (though it was a nice experience). According to the movie they were showing in the museum theatre, the last locomotive stopped running when people learned how much …