All posts tagged: Museum

Walls

Lest we forget that walls, by their very definition, divide, separate, form barriers — should we have to reexamine what these truly mean, not in the surface, we might very well find that it’s not what we want for humanity. In the words of Winston Churchill, “those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” Pictured: a section of the Berlin Wall in Newseum, Washington DC.  Unlike most museums I’ve visited, Newseum made me an emotional mess. The Pulitzer section was a reminder that every generation had their share of disasters and moments that define them, whether it be times of unimaginable sorrow or unmatched glee — the human condition showcased in a timeline of unforgettable images. Times that are forever etched in history, and our collective hearts and psyche, vividly displayed in headlines, pictures and made even more real by interviews of those who lived them. The 9/11 wing must have been the hardest to peruse, with a piece of the building at the center of the space, a very real …

Madame Mona Lisa, and Not Enough Time for Musee du Louvre

One of the items on my bucket list is to come face to face with madame Mona Lisa, an experience I was able to check off during a visit to The Louvre when I traveled to Paris with my Contiki group. That morning, our visit started with our tour manager telling our group that he would be showing us a secret entrance to The Louvre known only to a few. This, he said, would help us skip a lot of the longer lines. He of course had also pre-purchased our tickets. True to his word, we were able to get in without a hitch. The Louvre, we found out, was originally intended to be a castle but eventually determined not to be extravagant enough to serve its purpose. (This is the reason they built Versailles, which I wrote about in a previous post.) The museum itself is so large that if you would like to be able to see all the collections, you would need to dedicate a few days (maybe even more). We did …

The Hagia Sophia: a Great Testament to the Human Spirit

One of those things we as a society think we don’t agree about, is religion. There are currently approximately 4,200 known religions in the world — but the differences in beliefs aren’t the source of the disagreements. It’s the perception that we have more differences than we have in common, and that in those differences begin fear. Religion is a sensitive topic. It has, after all, spun wars for centuries, claiming thousands and thousands of lives. This is one of the main reasons why it was amazing to step foot in a place like the beautiful Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, now a museum but one with so much history — both cultural and religious. If you look around its interior, you would still see remnants of symbolism from different religions, as it was originally constructed as a Greek Orthodox basilica, later became a Roman Catholic church, and when the Ottoman Turks came to Turkey, it was converted into a Mosque. It is a testament to how a city evolves with time, a witness to the …