All posts tagged: National parks

Zion

If one has to look down to admire Bryce, the massive rock formations in Zion would have you gazing up in awe at its grandeur, magnificence, vastness and scale. Driving up to Zion was, just like most of Utah-Arizona-New-Mexico trip, driving up to a movie set. Or even a Disney amusement park with its large scale, nature themed rides. It was a perfect day, just enough sun, enough mists above the mountains for them to be picturesque, disappearing as mid morning crept in. I’d discovered there were two ends to Zion, you can enter one and think you’re seeing these grand, red canyons, then you pass a tunnel and then you’ll see these white, smooth and patterned rocks. We were less lazy that day, too. Driving to different spots, yes, but actually having the chance to hike a little, finally. We weren’t feeling all that well throughout the trip — having pushed to finish deadlines before vacation thereby exhausting ourselves both physically and mentally almost to the point of getting sick. So it was quite …

Inspiration Point 

They call it Inspiration Point. It took us our full visit to get there, taking our time, having been pushed to start at the other end of the park by the big bold “parking lot full” sign as we entered, driving from one lookout to another — at this point in our ten-day, 2300 mile sojourn being lazy travelers. It can, as it is aptly named, inspire sonnets and poems and masterpieces, the best view in Bryce Canyon National Park. Those of you who have read one or a few of my entries here before know that we are working our way through the national parks as part of our bucket list, or that is the dream, anyway. Bryce is beautiful. My, I feel inadequate. As if not one word I write will be enough to describe the feeling I was overcome upon encountering it, all of the wonders this entire trip, really. Stone castles formed by sand and wind, it is unreal the shapes and shadows cast at differing hours of just the short …

Collectors of Memory Fragments (and Pictures of Acadia)

There are these places we see, take our breath away and stay with us. Time passes and we forget details — but a sound, an image, a flicker of a memory, and one can relive the feeling of being captivated as if it were yesterday. Is it the intangible way we just know there are things that can affect one so greatly, a reminder of wonder and awe and life’s mysteries, time passing and the world’s beauty revealed in small fragments, whenever we set our eyes on a new sight, or share it with someone close to our heart? So we become a collector of fragments, seeking more of these pieces, of these places we take with us when we leave them behind and become a part of who we define ourselves to be. This post was inspired by pictures from our trip to Acadia National Park in Maine, US. As I mentioned in this blog before, one of our goals (my boyfriend and I) is to visit all US National Parks. We were able check …

Great Falls National Historic Park

There are those places we pass by a hundred times and don’t even know the many secrets they hide. Because we always have other places to be, things to get done, no time to discover the simpler, the unassuming. Photos taken at the Great Falls National Historic Park, Paterson, NJ, a park I didn’t even know existed in Jersey. It was a truly nice spring afternoon spent discovering this park and the beautiful falls in my own backyard. The best surprise was the rainbow that formed as the sun hit the water.  I was glad to have captured it in these photos, but these would not compare to being there in person.

The Weekend That Was: Steamtown

It’s interesting to think that there was a time when airplanes, which are a big part of not only travel, but industry and economy, were not around years ago. This weekend, my boyfriend and I had the chance to visit Steamtown National Historic Park in Scranton, PA, a few hours drive from NYC. It was a great way to learn about the history of the railroad, steam engines and how steam trains contributed to American economy in the 19th century, prior to the advent of the diesel engine — transporting people, food and everything you could think of, across the country — until the automobile industry took over. The museums were very educational and informative regarding the history of the locomotive, and you could take a 45 minute ride on a steam or diesel train. We did all these, but enjoyed the museums much more than the ride (though it was a nice experience). According to the movie they were showing in the museum theatre, the last locomotive stopped running when people learned how much …